Art school "Cademia"

History of the Art School and the Professional School for Arts and Crafts in Val Gardena

 The origins of the art handicraft in Val Gardena can be traced back to the mid-17th century. When woodcarving eventually became the main branch of industry in the valley at the beginning of the 18th century, a basic training for apprentices of this profession became necessary. In 1821, the government in Vienna approved the foundation of a “Drawing School” in Ortisei, in the Stefl Alt-Ianon building.

The wood carver and draughtsman Jakob Sotriffer de Plajes from Ortisei was the founder of this school. Well-known specialist teachers like Johann Burgauner from Kastelruth (Seis) and Vinzenz Runggaldier da Ianon from Ortisei taught at this professional school. In 1872, the young wood carver Ferdinand Demetz managed to found a “State-subsidized training workshop for wood carvers and painters” on his property in Ortisei. The school took over its name from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, where Demetz had studied, and thus became “Cademia”.

After the turmoil of war, some modernizing became inevitable. Significant didactic changes were brought about by the wood carver Alcide Ticò, who as the school’s principal introduced an all-day education between the years 1935 and 1937 and who added cultural subjects to the curriculum. During this time the school was given the name “Regia Scuola d’Arte”.

In the 1970s, the high-school diploma (A-level) was introduced in the Art School, and in 1976 the first Professional School for Wood Carvers and Painters was opened in Ortisei, as well as a branch of the school sometime later in Selva.

In the year 2000 the new school building of the Art School in Ortisei received the name “Cademia” in honor of its founder Ferdinand Demetz-Cademia. The two professional schools of Ortisei and Selva both moved to the school complex in Rezia Street in Ortisei. With the school year 2011/12, the Art School and the Professional School for Arts and Crafts were finally united under the same head office.

History of the Art School and the Professional School for Arts and Crafts in Val Gardena

 The origins of the art handicraft in Val Gardena can be traced back to the mid-17th century. When woodcarving eventually became the main branch of industry in the valley at the beginning of the 18th century, a basic training for apprentices of this profession became necessary. In 1821, the government in Vienna approved the foundation of a “Drawing School” in Ortisei, in the Stefl Alt-Ianon building.

The wood carver and draughtsman Jakob Sotriffer de Plajes from Ortisei was the founder of this school. Well-known specialist teachers like Johann Burgauner from Kastelruth (Seis) and Vinzenz Runggaldier da Ianon from Ortisei taught at this professional school. In 1872, the young wood carver Ferdinand Demetz managed to found a “State-subsidized training workshop for wood carvers and painters” on his property in Ortisei. The school took over its name from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, where Demetz had studied, and thus became “Cademia”.

After the turmoil of war, some modernizing became inevitable. Significant didactic changes were brought about by the wood carver Alcide Ticò, who as the school’s principal introduced an all-day education between the years 1935 and 1937 and who added cultural subjects to the curriculum. During this time the school was given the name “Regia Scuola d’Arte”.

In the 1970s, the high-school diploma (A-level) was introduced in the Art School, and in 1976 the first Professional School for Wood Carvers and Painters was opened in Ortisei, as well as a branch of the school sometime later in Selva.

In the year 2000 the new school building of the Art School in Ortisei received the name “Cademia” in honor of its founder Ferdinand Demetz-Cademia. The two professional schools of Ortisei and Selva both moved to the school complex in Rezia Street in Ortisei. With the school year 2011/12, the Art School and the Professional School for Arts and Crafts were finally united under the same head office.

 

Art School “Cademia”

The Art School “Cademia” stands out due to its broad range of courses in the artistic field and its advanced implementation of work and art techniques in the workshops. It paves the way for both academic studies and a professional career through the acquisition of general and specific knowledge and competences.

The additional elective subject of two hours a week offers further classes in the field of arts and music.

As part of the high school reform, the Art School Cademia provides on the one hand a deeper general education, and on the other hand it has maintained its strong practical orientation in the art subjects, with classes in the well-equipped workshops. This is what makes the art school “Cademia” a peculiar one among South Tyrol’s schools.

A distinctive characteristic of a Ladin school is the bilingual school system with classes in both German and Italian. The Ladin language represents an additional enrichment of our school. English is taught not only as a foreign language, but it also serves as a medium of teaching in the triennium (CLIL, i.e. content and language integrated learning).

The Art School puts its focus on the study of aesthetics and on artistic design. It enhances the analysis of art history and major artworks, and it leads the students to express themselves through a variety of artistic means.

The training course ranges from drawing, sketching and painting to sculptural design and three-dimensional realization. By examining the color theory, the perception theories, the perspective, the basic elements of the graphical, pictorial and sculptural depiction as well as by dealing with modern media and learning both traditional and modern techniques, the students are able to express their own ideas in an adequate and successful way.

The lessons – as mentioned above – are held according to the bilingual model, which means that one half of the subjects are taught in German and the other half in Italian. A sound knowledge of the two languages is therefore a good prerequisite, although the school offers further language courses. The students attend school four and a half days a week following the full-time education model (i.e. on five days a week but only four times in the afternoon). What is more, students are given the opportunity to do an internship in the 3rd and 4th form, to cooperate with public and private cultural organizations and to take part in various competitions.